Yesterday there were five votes in the House of Lords on the competition sections of the Health and Social Care Bill.  The amendments were all defeated by the Government and, despite all the LibDem huffing and puffing over the last few weeks, not a single LibDem Peer voted for any of them.

The first amendment which would have placed a duty on the Secretary of State in respect of standards of adult social care was defeated by 261 votes to 203 – with 66 LibDems voting with the Tories against the amendment.

The second amendment which would have protected the NHS from the worst effects of competition (and was originally moved by a LibDem peer) was defeated by 275 votes to 188 with 66 LibDems voting with the Tories.

The third amendment which would have retained Monitor’s role as the independent regulator of NHS Trusts was defeated by 255 votes to 183 with 65 LibDems voting with the Tories.

The fourth amendment which would have tried to limit “anti-collaborative” behaviour in the NHS was defeated by 221 votes to 171 with 58 LibDems voting with the Tories.

The fifth amendment which would have enabled NHS commissioners to determine the most effective way of delivering NHS services without necessarily putting them out to the market was defeated by 203 votes to 157 with 52 LibDems voting with the Tories.

In none of the divisions did a single LibDem vote with Labour to protect the NHS.

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