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Archive for July, 2013

Monday
Jul 29,2013

Two issues today highlight the way this Conservative-led LibDem-supported Coalition Government operates.

Fees of up to £1200 to bring an employment tribunal case are being introduced today.  This is allegedly intended to prevent so-called vexatious claims from being brought.  The reality is that for the first time since employment tribunals were introduced in the 1960s there will be charges imposed to deter those who have been badly treated or exploited by their employers.  The fees discriminate against the weak and the low paid.

Less important, but symptomatic of the way this Government pays lip-service to engagement and consultation are a series of consultation exercises launched in the last few days with closing dates for response at the end of August or in the first week of September.  Good practice would be that consultations should be open for up to three months – five weeks over the peak holiday period is designed to stifle responses.  The consultations cover such matters as pensions fro retained firefighters, the housing transfer manual, and various notices under the Gas and Electricity Acts (and yes, I don’t know what these are about, but they are no doubt complicated and take time to understand their implications).

I am not surprised by the Tories, but I hope the LibDems are ashamed of themselves.

Monday
Jul 22,2013

I have tabled a question for oral answer in the House of Lords this afternoon, as follows:

“To ask HM Government what proportion of the United Kingdom’s critical national infrastructure is owned by foreign-owned companies; and what assessment they have made of the benefits and disbenefits of that level of ownership”

I am sure I will receive a courteous answer but I rather suspect that what it will boil down to is (1) the Government don’t really know what proportion of our infrastructure is in foreign hands; (2) that they haven’t really got a policy on it; and (3) even if they wanted to do something about it they feel it is either too late or there is nothing that they can do.

Earlier this month the Government announced, in response to a critical report from the Intelligence and Security Committee, that it would be reviewing the role of Chinese-owned Huawei in the UK’s telecommunications and security infrastructure.  This is welcome, if a bit late.  I have been banging on about this for ages: for example here and here.

Six years ago the think tank Chatham House reported that

“as much as 90% of the UK’s critical national infrastructure is not government owned and a large proportion of that is under foreign ownership.”

Most of London’s electricity is provided by Electricite de France.  Does anyone seriously doubt what would happen if it was a choice between switching the lights out in London or Paris because of some crisis?

In the last 10 years, Ferrovial of Spain has bought BAA, the operator of Heathrow and Stansted airports, Germany’s RWE has acquired npower, and Australian bank Macquarie has taken control of car parks by buying NCP.

German group Deutsche Bahn recently bought rail and bus operator Arriva, while ports company P&O, which owns assets at Tilbury and Southampton, was also bought by Dubai’s DP World in 2006.

This Government bangs on about the threat to British sovereignty presented by the UK’s membership of the EU, but they seem to be utterly silent on the implications for our sovereignty of having so much of our infrastructure controlled by foreign governments or its future being determined  at the whim of foreign investors who are unlikely to have the UK’s national interest at the top of their priorities.

Very few other nations would be so sanguine.